I Buy Irish

I wrote a lot before Christmas about buying Irish – the difficulties in buying Irish made products, and the potential alternatives of buying from Irish retailers rather than German or UK originating ones.

Having thought about this over the holidays, and having completed my Christmas shopping without going to Newry, I’d just like to declare – “I Buy Irish“.

Where I can, I will buy Irish products over imported ones, and where such options aren’t available, I’ll buy from Irish retailers rather than foreign ones.

I appreciate that at times that could have me paying a little over the odds for certain items, but I still shop smart and shop around to find the best value and quality within the bounds of my Irish purchasing.

There are two key reasons that I Buy Irish:

  • I myself work for an Irish company – so I need other Irish people to buy Irish for us to do well. And with that, I therefore know how other employees of Irish companies depend on people buying Irish.
  • My employers customers are primarily Irish – so in order for my company to do well, other Irish people need to buy Irish.

You could say that, ultimately, I Buy Irish out of self-interest. When I buy Irish goods and services, or from Irish stores and service providers then Irish businesses, employers and employees do well.

And when other Irish business people and employees do well, they’ll spend more with my own employers. And when my own employer does well, I’ll do well.

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7 Responses to I Buy Irish

  1. Donal January 15, 2009 at 10:39 #

    It’s amazing how the guaranteed Irish symbol, so prevalent when I was growing up, just disappeared for the last 10 years or so.

    The problem with buying Irish though is that what’s advertised as Irish might only have been packaged here or be of an Irish recipe as was seen during the recent pork debacle.

  2. Eloise January 15, 2009 at 12:40 #

    The best thing you can do for Irish business and Irish consumers is to buy the best product at the best price. You do no favours to Irish business by blindly buying inferior products at extortionate prices – that is ultimately what has allowed prices to soar and eroded our competitiveness. Irish consumers must do their bit to raise the bar for Irish business by become more skilled and discerning shoppers. That means buying “foreign” when it makes more economic sense to do so.

  3. Kieran January 15, 2009 at 19:25 #

    I couldn’t agree more with Eloise. It’s foolish to support bloated, uncompetitve Irish retailers or producers and to pay over the odds out of some sort of misguided nationalism.

  4. Marie January 15, 2009 at 21:20 #

    Eloise/Kieran – Value Ireland wasn’t suggesting supporting Irish goods when they are crap and/or overpriced.

    It is in our interests to support Irish goods – i always do this and I will pay a bit extra. I understand having been self employed that some costs here are higher than elsewhere. I also support shops where some at least of the staff are Irish (not politically correct to say this).

  5. heather January 17, 2009 at 22:48 #

    @marie… how can you tell the staff are irish or not? it’s a bit tricky since they lets all these foreigners into the country. is it by the colour of their skin? i know a few darkies who are irish, mind you. can’t be by their accent. i have a stupid accent and even *i’m* irish! are you asking for passports and the like? pls advise.

  6. valueireland January 17, 2009 at 23:26 #

    @Donal – You’re right. I’m currently working on a post about a great example recently of the “product of Ireland” anomaly in packaging regulations. Next week hopefully.

    @Eloise and Kieran – Can I ask where you folks work? Does your employer depend on people in Ireland spending money with them out of choice? Who are your employers competitors?

    If you read my comment, I did say – “I appreciate that at times that could have me paying a little over the odds for certain items, but I still shop smart and shop around to find the best value and quality within the bounds of my Irish purchasing.”

    I’m not an idiot! I don’t “blindly buying inferior products at extortionate prices”.

    Nor do I “support bloated, uncompetitve Irish retailers or producers and to pay over the odds out of some sort of misguided nationalism.”

    I do actually like to consider myself a “skilled and discerning shoppers” – have you actually read the rest of this website?

    It’s unfortunately for me that the main place where my money is being spent on “bloated, uncompetitve Irish” businesses is when our government spend my tax money on multiple quangos that don’t actually produce anything and do little to improve the lives of Irish people apart from the many (though obviously not all) inefficient and unproductive people working there.

    If only we could have the security of working for the government, safe in the knowledge that the government won’t have the balls to make any changes there, despite our many woes at the moment.

    @Marie – thanks for your support, but I don’t believe that there’s much to be gained from your decision on where to shop.

    In many cases, there aren’t Irish people who would actually work in these jobs – even in todays straightened times. They’d much rather be “government artists” rather than earn a living working in shops like these.

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  1. » Buy Irish - something to think about - ValueIreland.com : Ireland's Only Truly Independent Consumer Watchdog - June 29, 2009

    […] the past, I’ve written about how as much as possible I’ll buy Irish. I came across this post from John McGerr who posted a paraphrase of a post that he found on an […]

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