Internet cookies on your computer will cost you money

This tweet recently, from @sampsonian, was very popular with more than 100 retweets. It’s from someone highlighting how the Ryanair website recognises when you’re back visiting them more than once, and tries to charge you more the second time around.

Ryanair exhibit A. Looked up fare yesterday, total £123.00. Returned today and fare is £237.oo. Flushed cookies. Fare is back to £123.00.

It’s a sneaky trick, but it’s nothing new. Your can read an article here on how cookies can cost you money that I wrote back in 2009.

If you’re not sure on how to clear the cookies from your computer if you think you’re losing out because of this, just search Google for the browser that you’re using with the words “clear my cookies” to find instructions. Some browsers will allow you set this automatically as well so that the cookies are cleared each time you close down your browser – but that’s maybe a bit extreme.

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3 Responses to Internet cookies on your computer will cost you money

  1. Maura June 1, 2011 at 07:32 #

    I must have learned this a long time ago as I use a different IP address never mind a different computer for this very reason….if a person has only one computer, perhaps they could clear cookies after a session with Ryanair or indeed any other airline…I think the same applies to them all. Hot about this ….online, change a typo in name….i letter, costs €100 – BUT rang them on the 0818 number which probably costs €50 !! and they kindly changed ir for me FREE.
    OK – I was grateful.

  2. ben June 20, 2011 at 17:28 #

    It’s completely untrue, and today I learned that “ValueIreland” has a policy of just dumbly repeating whatever people say without doing the most basic of checking up on it. Useful to know!

  3. valueireland June 20, 2011 at 18:24 #

    Hi Ben,
    Thanks for your comment.
    If you read my original blog post on this, you’ll see that I did say “I have a feeling that some of our more well known Irish airline websites might utilise this type of trickery, but can’t confirm one way or the other.”
    As the article you’re referring to does state, the company doing the research have no absolute proof one way or another that Ryanair, or anyone else, does or doesn’t do this kind of cookies manipulation.
    It’s been known to happen on other websites in the past, so all I’m doing is making people aware of what could / might happen.
    I can’t do anything more than that.
    Diarmuid

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